• Image of Britten V1000 • Andrew Stroud • 1995 World BEARS Championship
  • Image of Britten V1000 • Andrew Stroud • 1995 World BEARS Championship
  • Image of Britten V1000 • Andrew Stroud • 1995 World BEARS Championship
  • Image of Britten V1000 • Andrew Stroud • 1995 World BEARS Championship
  • Image of Britten V1000 • Andrew Stroud • 1995 World BEARS Championship

It was 1992 at the Daytona Battle of the Twin. John Britten, the underdog from New Zealand, shocked the motorcycle racing world when his hand-built bike, ridden by Andrew Stroud roared through the starting grid and took the lead. For a few laps, Andrew toyed with Pascal Picotte on a Ducati. However in the last 2 laps, his bike began to slow down due to a faulty rectifier which lost him the race.

John Britten had built the V1000 from his backyard with a few enthusiastic friends. The bike was nothing the world had ever seen. It was far ahead of its time. The Britten did not have a frame — everything was mounted on its V-twin engine. Its radiator was under the seat to improve aerodynamics. Its rear suspension was in front of the engine. It used a double wishbone girder fork instead of a telescopic fork. It had carbon wheels. It had electronic fuel injection, and John could change the mapping from his computer (this was when GP bikes were still running on flat carb). And it had a stunning body shape.

At a young age, John suffered from dyslexia and had problems with his education. He took part time courses on engineering and became an industrial designer. Due to New Zealand’s remoteness and with little access to resources, John made most of the parts himself — in total, about 7,000 parts. He went on to beat the big factory boys.

Although they did not win the 1992 Daytona, the following year, they won the New Zealand Formula One. They also set the fastest speed record in the Isle of Man TT. In 1994, they won the British, European and American Race (BEARS) in Australia. The real success was when Andrew Stroud brought home the 1995 World BEARS Championship.

Sadly 3 weeks later John passed away at 45, after battling skin cancer. It was a great loss for the motorcycle world, as John was considered one of the most influential bike designers. Today, we see much of his technologies in current bike design.

In total only 10 Brittens were built. Most of them are with collectors and museums all over the world. Even after John’s death, the Brittens went on to win many more races. Today one particular Britten owned by Kevin Grant, a true motorcyle racing enthusiast occasionally still appears in bike festivals doing lap of honour. The thundering sound of its engine and presence still reminds enthusiasts how a humble man with big dreams went on to beat motorcycle companies with more financial power and resources.

While no actual sum has been disclosed on the current price of a Britten, for most people it is considered as the Holy Grail of motorcycles and therefore priceless.

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Engine: 4-stroke, liquid cool V-Twin
Displacement: 999cc
Weight: 304Ib (138kg)
Power: 166hp @ 11,800rpm
Top Speed: 188mph (303 km/h)

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Print Size: A2 (420mm x 594mm)
Approx 16.53" x 23.38"
Print Type: OffSet Lithographic 4C Printing
Paper: Maple White - Acid Free - 220gsm

Take Note: Paper stock base colour do differ slightly from batches to batches due to its 50% recycle properties.

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Free Shipping for 3 or more prints.
Discount Code: FRSP

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Limited to 100 prints only.